MEMRISTOR - Memory Resistor - A nonvolatile on-chip memory

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The electronic forum deals with the topics related to analog and digital circuits and systems (i.e. ASIC, FPGA, DSPs, Microcontroller, Single/Multi Processors, PCBs etc) and their programming such as HDL, C/C++, etc.

MEMRISTOR - Memory Resistor - A nonvolatile on-chip memory

Unread postby UCERD.COM » Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:12 pm

Memristors are basically a fourth class of electrical circuit, joining the resistor, the capacitor, and the inductor, that exhibit their unique properties primarily at the nanoscale. Theoretically, Memristors, a concatenation of “memory resistors”, are a type of passive circuit elements that maintain a relationship between the time integrals of current and voltage across a two terminal element. Thus, a memristors resistance varies according to a devices memristance function, allowing, via tiny read charges, access to a “history” of applied voltage. The material implementation of memristive effects can be determined in part by the presence of hysteresis (an accelerating rate of change as an object moves from one state to another) which, like many other non-linear “anomalies” in contemporary circuit theory, turns out to be less an anomaly than a fundamental property of passive circuitry.
Until recently, when HP Labs under Stanley Williams developed the first stable prototype, memristance as a property of a known material was nearly nonexistant. The memristance effect at non-nanoscale distances is dwarfed by other electronic and field effects, until scales and materials that are nanometers in size are utilized. At the nanoscale, such properties have even been observed in action prior to the HP Lab prototypes.
But beyond the physics of electrical engineering, they are a reconceptualizing of passive electronic circuit theory first proposed in 1971 by the nonlinear circuit theorist Leon Chua. What Leon Chua, a UC Berkeley Professor, contended in his 1971 paper Transactions on Circuit Theory, is that the fundamental relationship in passive circuitry was not between voltage and charge as assumed, but between changes-in-voltage, or flux, and charge. Chua has stated: “The situation is analogous to what is called “Aristotle’s Law of Motion, which was wrong, because he said that force must be proportional to velocity. That misled people for 2000 years until Newton came along and pointed out that Aristotle was using the wrong variables. Newton said that force is proportional to acceleration–the change in velocity. This is exactly the situation with electronic circuit theory today. All electronic textbooks have been teaching using the wrong variables–voltage and charge–explaining away inaccuracies as anomalies. What they should have been teaching is the relationship between changes in voltage, or flux, and charge.”
As memristors develop, its going to come down to, in part, who can come up with the best material implementation. Currently IBM, Hewlett Packard, HRL, Samsung and many other research labs seem to be hovering around the titanium dioxide memristor, but there are quite a few other types of memristors with vectors of inquiry.

Memristor Model Download


Publications and Material
  1. The Missing MEMRISTOR Found
  2. Memristor-the missing circuit element
  3. SPICE model of memristor with nonlinear dopant drift
  4. PSPICE modeling of meminductor

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MEMRISTOR Tutorials - Memory Resistor

Unread postby UCERD.COM » Fri Aug 30, 2013 12:55 pm

Memristors Project : 
Memristors and Nanowires : 
Memristors-The-Lost-Circuit : 
Memristor from the HP Labs publication and PSPICE tutorial : 
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Re: MEMRISTOR - Memory Resistor - A nonvolatile on-chip memo

Unread postby peynir » Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:34 am

@Cheema, this is an interesting read. Although I was aware of the use of memresistors but I never really tried to use them in my circuits but now I’m a little interested and curious as well to see how they actually work in a circuit. Although it’s easy to see that because of the RLC properties of a material hysteresis can be created and the resistor would therefore be able to remember the last logic level but there are some questions that pop into one’s head. Since it is passive circuitry, we can’t expect it to remember the history for infinite amount of time, there has to a be a limit on how long data can be stored In this type of material logic level but there are some questions that pop into one’s head. Since it is passive circuitry, we can’t expect it to remember the history for infinite amount of time, there has to be a limit on how long data can be stored in this type of material. Is there any information regarding the losses or efficiency of this material over a period of time.
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Re: MEMRISTOR - Memory Resistor - A nonvolatile on-chip memo

Unread postby UCERD.COM » Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:50 pm

Thanks @peynir
We are working on latest and future memory technologies, which are suitable for high performance computing applications (multi core systems etc.).
For data storage memristors, Flash etc have potential but these memories have high data read/write latencies which not good for high speed systems.
In our current work we are surveying different state of the art memories and memory systems and proposing a memory controller suitable for future memory technologies.

Embedded RAM, 3D stacking for DRAM connection, and HP memristor model are showing some promises to remove SRAM/DRAM combination.
But none of yet gave a reasonable result.

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